High Schools

As classes move online, human connections matter more than ever for graduate students — professor

Cynthia Miller-Idriss is a professor of education and sociology at the American University, which was the first university in the Washington region to move to online coursework in the wake of the covid-19 outbreak. In this post she looks at the challenges of moving lessons on line especially, but not only, for graduate students.

By Cynthia Miller-Idriss

Colleges across the country are scrambling with the repercussions of moving to online instruction in the face of rising infections from covid-19. Observers have rightly raised concerns about issues of food insecurity and undergraduate student employment, especially as some campuses are also advising

Read More

AERA Cancels In-Person Conference Due to Coronavirus. The Event Will Be Held Virtually – Inside School Research

The annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association scheduled for next month in San Francisco has been cancelled and will now take place virtually because of the spread of the novel coronavirus, leaders of the group announced Friday.

California is one of the states with the highest number of confirmed cases of the virus in the United States. The governor has declared a state of emergency, as has the mayor of San Francisco.

In a lengthy statement, AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine and AERA President Vanessa Siddle Walker said: “Sadly, the pernicious presence and spread of the

Read More

Bored, Stressed, Tired: Unpacking Teenagers’ Emotions About High School – Inside School Research

At first glance, it could seem that teenagers just really, really hate high school.

When researchers at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and Yale Child Study Center asked more than 21,678 U.S. high school students to say how they typically felt at school, nearly 75 percent of their answers were negative. “Tired” topped the list, followed by “bored” and “stressed,” with positive words like “happy” distantly following.

But bad memories tend to be stickier than good ones, so the researchers then took a different tack: At five high schools, they asked more than 470 students to report their feelings

Read More

Bored, Stressed, Tired: Unpacking Teenagers’ Emotions About High School – Inside School Research

At first glance, it could seem that teenagers just really, really hate high school.

When researchers at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and Yale Child Study Center asked more than 21,678 U.S. high school students to say how they typically felt at school, nearly 75 percent of their answers were negative. “Tired” topped the list, followed by “bored” and “stressed,” with positive words like “happy” distantly following.

But bad memories tend to be stickier than good ones, so the researchers then took a different tack: At five high schools, they asked more than 470 students to report their feelings

Read More

In Many Districts, a Child’s Academic Trajectory Is Set by 3rd Grade – Inside School Research

Washington, D.C.

America’s schools are intended to be an equalizer, a way to launch students from low-income families up the economic and social ladder. But a new study finds that in most school districts, a child’s academic mobility is just as tied to where he lives as his economic and social mobility.

Using 14 years of school district data across six states, a team of researchers with the National Center for the Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research, tracked the academic progress and graduation rates of 2.5 million children based on how they performed on 3rd grade reading and

Read More

Advocates Concerned Trump Plan Will Slash Ed. Research, Unmoor Nation’s Report Card and Statistics Center – Inside School Research

Education research received mixed support in the Trump Administration’s proposed fiscal 2021 budget, which would eliminate several education research programs under the Institute of Education Sciences and other agencies, as well as removing national assessments from the National Center for Education Statistics. 

The changes are part of the White House’s proposed $66.6 billion budget for the Education Department in fiscal 2021, a 7.8 percent decrease from fiscal 2020. The plan would collapse 29 programs—including the mammoth Title I funding for educating children in poverty‐into one block grant funded at $4.7 billion less than the current total for the programs. 


For

Read More

Storytime, Meet Number Play: Early Math in the Home Matters for Later Skills – Inside School Research

Parents have gotten the message that reading with their children can help instill lifelong literacy skills. A new study adds to the evidence that parents can be providing the same boost to numeracy skills by making sure their preschool children have an enriching math home life, too.

A new study in the journal Child Development tracked nearly 370 Spanish-speaking Chilean children and their families over two years, from the start of preschool through the end of kindergarten. Regardless of families’ socioeconomic background, the study found preschoolers whose parents gave them frequent opportunities to do simple math problems and games at

Read More

Children as Young as 9 and 10 Think About Killing Themselves. Adults Around Them Have No Clue. – Inside School Research

By Sarah D. Sparks and Alex Harwin

Educators trying to halt the skyrocketing number of young people killing themselves need to intervene far earlier than they might think: A new study finds children as young as 9 and 10 report suicidal thoughts and self-harm.

Suicide among young people has reached a 30-year high, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Suicide rates for teens ages 15 to 19 jumped by 76 percent from 2007 to 2017, but suicide rates for younger adolescents, ages 10 to 14, nearly tripled during that time. And the CDC has

Read More

Brain Scans in the Classroom? Project Trains Teachers to Do Hands-On Research – Inside School Research

Neuroscience has given educators a new way of thinking about how students change and grow as they learn. Now one research partnership is teaching them how to see it happen in real time. 

The Haskins Global Literacy Hub, a research lab associated with Yale University, partnered with two independent schools to study students as they learn to read over several years. But rather than just receiving feedback from the researchers, teachers at the Windward School in New York and AIM Academy in Philadelphia—each of which serves students with language-related disabilities like dyslexia—are learning to monitor and understand their own students’

Read More