High Schools

SAT Scores, Test-Takers Tick Down Amid COVID-19 Closures – Inside School Research

Widespread and ongoing closures in the wake of the coronavius pandemic played havoc with college admissions tests this spring and summer, with both the average performance and participation declining, according to the annual report of the College Board, which administers the test.

Just under 2.2 million students took the SAT in 2020, about 22,000 students fewer than last year, and the number of students participating in the essay portion of the test fell from 64 percent to 57 percent. The average scores for the 2020 test also dropped, from 528 to 523 in math and from 531 to

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Returning more kids to school is going to require a bolder plan

What is it going to take to get all kids back in school? That’s the topic of this post, written by David Rubin, Meredith Matone and Susan Coffin — who are faculty members at PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia — and Meira Levinson, a faculty member at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education.

By David Rubin, Meredith Matone, Susan Coffin and Meira Levinson

In the last few weeks, as schools have faced challenging decisions about reopening, our centers were among those that offered their administrators evidence-based guidance keenly focused on keeping children, families, teachers and staff safe. We proposed

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DeVos drops controversial rule giving coronavirus aid to private schools

The Education Department did not respond to a query about the issue. The department did not announce the decision to drop the rule but put it in an update Wednesday about the Cares Act. The department said that the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia had ordered the rule vacated on Friday, Sept. 4, and that, therefore, the rule “is no longer in effect.”

Lawmakers from both parties said that most of the Cares Act’s K-12 education funding was intended to be distributed to public and private elementary and secondary schools using a formula based on how many

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How to log in to a student portal — all 65 steps

Annett said she wrote this piece one morning amid repeated failed attempts to log in to the student portal. She eventually got in, but recently, she said, the password mysteriously reset and she needed the help of a patient and kind school administrator to fix it.

Annett’s work has appeared in the New York Times, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Real Simple, the Rumpus, Good Housekeeping and many other places. She has a book forthcoming in 2021 titled, “I am ‘Why Do I Need Venmo?’ Years Old.”

This piece circulates on Facebook every semester among her friends and was published on the

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There are now more police officers in Florida’s schools than nurses — report

The report was the result of a collaborative effort led by the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, the Florida Social Justice in Schools Project, the Southern Poverty Law Center, the League of Women Voters of Florida and Equality Florida.

It looks at data collected by the state government to analyze the impact of the Florida Legislature’s decision to mandate that every public school in the state have a police officer or an armed school employee stationed there.

The law was passed less than a month after a gunman on Feb. 14, 2018, killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas

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Open letter to Biden and Harris: How to undo damage DeVos did to public education

In some bit of irony, Trump and DeVos pushed the public schools that they have disparaged to open for the 2020-2021 school year, and at one point threatened to withhold federal funding from those that did not. (They didn’t have the power to withhold funding already approved by Congress.)

Biden, vice president under President Barack Obama and now the Democratic presidential nominee, and his running mate, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.), have both savaged the Trump-DeVos education agenda. And they have said they would try to make the education system more equitable for underserved students.

This post is an open

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What Do Schools Need to Be Better After Coronavirus? – Inside School Research

As schools across the country take their first tentative steps to a new school year during the pandemic, education experts argue that state and district support could mean the difference between continuing in crisis mode or innovating for long-term improvement and equity.

In a new 120-page framework for school reopening, the Learning Policy Institute echoes recommendations of other recent expert panels, from the National Academies of Science to the School Superintendents Association:

  • Close the digital divide
  • Strengthen distance and blended learning
  • Assess what students need
  • Ensure supports for social and emotional learning
  • Redesign schools for stronger relationships
  • Emphasize authentic,
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Photo shows students jammed together at Florida high school

Volusia County Schools started Monday with a number of health and safety guidelines in place. One of these guidelines encourages safe distancing.

We are aware of a picture circulating that shows a large group of students waiting for schedules at Spruce Creek High School. When administrators saw the large crowd forming, they immediately dispersed the crowd. We believe this picture is a snapshot of a gathering that lasted just a few minutes.

That said, we are committed to making Volusia County Schools as safe as possible.

Many strategies are in place to prevent large gatherings and to provide the ability

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Does homework work when kids are learning all day at home?

But now, school for millions of students means working at home doing school work all day, because school buildings are closed to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus and its disease, covid-19. That raises the question: How feasible is it to ask kids to do even more work in the same environment, especially for kids who live in environments not conducive to studying?

The closing of schools this past spring as the pandemic hit put a new focus on issues of equity, racism and access to education technology and the Internet. Now that many, if not most, school districts

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