High Schools

National Education Association, nation’s largest union, endorses Joe Biden for president

Eskelsen García, who had earlier that she would wait to endorse to see who had the ability to attract voters, made the announcement not long after Biden’s seemingly stalled campaign got a huge and surprising boost in Super Tuesday races in early March.

After a number of key rivals ended their campaigns and endorsed Biden, he has become the front-runner for the Democratic Party’s nomination and seems close to being the presumptive nominee.

“He understands that as a nation we have a moral responsibility to provide a great neighborhood public school for every student in every Zip code,” Eskelsen García

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Long School Closures Could Cost U.S. Billions, Cut Health-Care Capacity – Inside School Research

Closing schools can be one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of infectious diseases. But for COVID-19, the respiratory illness linked to the highly contagious new coronavirus, research suggests school and public health leaders will have to weigh those potential benefits against the costs of keeping children’s parents home, too.

“If you close all schools, there’s going to be very, very large scale absenteeism for people who have to stay home with their kids,” said Joshua Epstein, an epidemiology professor at New York University’s school of global public health.

As of Friday evening, at least 46,000 schools

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Why the mayor of New York City is determined to keep schools open

We want to keep them open, Wolf. That’s both about our kids’ education, of course, but also about the realities. We have so many working New Yorkers who have no other place for their kids to be during the day. We have a huge number of single-parent households where they don’t have another place for their kids. They can’t bring their kids to work. There’s a lot of very practical problems.

On top of that, if parents don’t have any choice, they will simply not be able to go to work at all and have to stay home with their

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As classes move online, human connections matter more than ever for graduate students — professor

Cynthia Miller-Idriss is a professor of education and sociology at the American University, which was the first university in the Washington region to move to online coursework in the wake of the covid-19 outbreak. In this post she looks at the challenges of moving lessons on line especially, but not only, for graduate students.

By Cynthia Miller-Idriss

Colleges across the country are scrambling with the repercussions of moving to online instruction in the face of rising infections from covid-19. Observers have rightly raised concerns about issues of food insecurity and undergraduate student employment, especially as some campuses are also advising

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AERA Cancels In-Person Conference Due to Coronavirus. The Event Will Be Held Virtually – Inside School Research

The annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association scheduled for next month in San Francisco has been cancelled and will now take place virtually because of the spread of the novel coronavirus, leaders of the group announced Friday.

California is one of the states with the highest number of confirmed cases of the virus in the United States. The governor has declared a state of emergency, as has the mayor of San Francisco.

In a lengthy statement, AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine and AERA President Vanessa Siddle Walker said: “Sadly, the pernicious presence and spread of the

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Bored, Stressed, Tired: Unpacking Teenagers’ Emotions About High School – Inside School Research

At first glance, it could seem that teenagers just really, really hate high school.

When researchers at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and Yale Child Study Center asked more than 21,678 U.S. high school students to say how they typically felt at school, nearly 75 percent of their answers were negative. “Tired” topped the list, followed by “bored” and “stressed,” with positive words like “happy” distantly following.

But bad memories tend to be stickier than good ones, so the researchers then took a different tack: At five high schools, they asked more than 470 students to report their feelings

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Bored, Stressed, Tired: Unpacking Teenagers’ Emotions About High School – Inside School Research

At first glance, it could seem that teenagers just really, really hate high school.

When researchers at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and Yale Child Study Center asked more than 21,678 U.S. high school students to say how they typically felt at school, nearly 75 percent of their answers were negative. “Tired” topped the list, followed by “bored” and “stressed,” with positive words like “happy” distantly following.

But bad memories tend to be stickier than good ones, so the researchers then took a different tack: At five high schools, they asked more than 470 students to report their feelings

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In Many Districts, a Child’s Academic Trajectory Is Set by 3rd Grade – Inside School Research

Washington, D.C.

America’s schools are intended to be an equalizer, a way to launch students from low-income families up the economic and social ladder. But a new study finds that in most school districts, a child’s academic mobility is just as tied to where he lives as his economic and social mobility.

Using 14 years of school district data across six states, a team of researchers with the National Center for the Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research, tracked the academic progress and graduation rates of 2.5 million children based on how they performed on 3rd grade reading and

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Advocates Concerned Trump Plan Will Slash Ed. Research, Unmoor Nation’s Report Card and Statistics Center – Inside School Research

Education research received mixed support in the Trump Administration’s proposed fiscal 2021 budget, which would eliminate several education research programs under the Institute of Education Sciences and other agencies, as well as removing national assessments from the National Center for Education Statistics. 

The changes are part of the White House’s proposed $66.6 billion budget for the Education Department in fiscal 2021, a 7.8 percent decrease from fiscal 2020. The plan would collapse 29 programs—including the mammoth Title I funding for educating children in poverty‐into one block grant funded at $4.7 billion less than the current total for the programs. 


For

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