Tools Connecting High Schoolers to Financial Success


Research from the U.S. Treasury Department implies that educating students about smart financial decisions is as critical as ever: only 1 out of 6 students currently have the baseline of economic knowledge they need to be successful long-term.

Connecting students to financial know-how, including information about financial institutions, provides a means for young people to achieve their dreams. With no cost resources from Pathway to Financial Success in School – a program from Discover Financial Services and Discovery Education – educators now have a way to give students the tools they need to succeed financially.

Designed for wherever learning takes place, the all-new self-paced modules for high school students connect the classroom to the real-world in meaningful and accessible ways.  Whether planning for college or other major life decisions, these modules help students construct healthy money habits that last a lifetime.

In the Understanding Financial Institutions module, high schoolers practice the critical thinking skills needed to decide which bank or credit union is right for them. This module also helps students explore the world of financial institutions to discover how they work and how the online-only environment transforms money management.

Students can then go even deeper in the Opening New Accounts module. In this module students learn the answers to questions such like: What do you need to do before opening a bank account? Which institution meets your needs? How does age impact accounts?

The Pathway to Financial Success in School resources can be integrated into instruction in a variety of ways. No matter how they are used, they will help all students take control of their financial future. Find the dynamic digital content available to educators, students, and families at no cost at pathwaysinschools.com. For Discovery Education Experience users in both the Financial Literacy channel and the Pathway to Financial Success in School channel.





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