Classroom Management

Should Teachers Enforce School Rules When Students Are Learning at Home? – Teaching Now

As a growing number of school districts decide to start the school year entirely remotely, teachers will have to answer an important question: How many of their classroom norms and rules will they enforce when students are home? 

Teachers grappled with this question in the spring, when school buildings abruptly closed down due to the coronavirus outbreak. Students were suddenly learning from home, and teachers had to quickly decide if they would enforce dress codes or rules about snacking and other behaviors through a webcam. Many teachers pleaded with their peers to be lenient, as students were adjusting to

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Teaching and Learning in the Pandemic

Published:

—Stephanie Shafer for Education Week

When teachers go back to school this fall, the classroom as they’ve known it will be gone, and their instruction will be more critical than ever.

That’s a daunting combination, but it’s what the pandemic has delivered. The spring produced crisis schooling, and teachers and schools scrambled to find online resources and master remote teaching techniques. A more deliberate approach this fall could mean a better experience for students; the lack of one could turn equity gaps into chasms.

With so much riding on instruction, districts need to plan for it

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How to Make Lessons Cohesive When Teaching Both Remote and In-Person Classes

Aimee Rodriguez Webb reads emails at her dining room table, which she set up as a virtual classroom in Marietta, Ga. After a rocky transition to distance learning last spring, Webb bought a dry-erase board and a special camera for displaying worksheets.

—AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Even in schools offering face-to-face instruction this fall, one “class” of students likely won’t be the coherent unit that it was in past years.

Within one 5th grade class, for example, students may be split in a hybrid schedule—half in-person two or three days, online the rest. Some may have opted for fully remote instruction

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Bitmoji Classrooms: Why Teachers Are Buzzing About Them

—Image courtesy of Morgan Miller/Bitmoji via Twitter

If social media posts are any indication, Bitmoji classrooms are becoming a teacher obsession. Since so many teachers are planning to “return” only to online classrooms in the fall, they’re building these colorful virtual environments for their students featuring avatar versions of themselves. 

In thousands of posts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, teachers are sharing the classrooms they’ve built. Using the Bitmoji app to create their avatars, and other tools like Google or Canva to build the classroom backdrop, they’re making welcoming spaces, complete with colorful rugs and posters, that can serve as

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The 8 Things Teachers Know for Certain When Schools Reopen

First Person

—francescoch/iStock

The idea of reopening schools is rife with uncertainty. Here’s what teachers can hold onto

By

Casey M. Bethel

COVID-19 is taking a toll on everyone, but the pandemic is an especially tense time for teachers who are grappling with a separate list of concerns. You can tell from the questions being posted on teacher-discussion pages: How and when will schools open fully? How prepared will students be to learn when they do? With the way last semester ended, how much did students miss? With no camps this summer, how much did they slide?

Did any of

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Want to Maximize Student Learning When Schools Reopen? Minimize Classroom Interruptions – Teaching Now

During even the most normal school year, there are a lot of little interruptions to teaching and learning each day—a tardy student walking into class, an announcement over the loudspeaker, a call to the classroom phone. 

Those interruptions can add up to the loss of between 10 and 20 days of instructional time, a new study finds. And as schools across the country prepare to welcome back students in the fall after a disrupted spring, they will need to address what is expected to be significant learning loss. Reducing external interruptions in the classroom could be one way to

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Can Teachers Really Do Their Jobs in Masks?

Students raise their fingers to answer their teacher Sandrine Albiez, wearing a face mask, in a school in Strasbourg, eastern France May 14.

—Jean-Francois Badias/AP

There’s a lot of uncertainty about how schools will eventually return to in-person instruction. But in many places, teachers will likely be encouraged—or required—to wear masks.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all school employees wear cloth face coverings, and many school and district leaders are incorporating that guidance into their reopening plans. Some states, including California and Texas, are providing millions of masks for teachers in an attempt to

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Q&A Collections: Classroom-Management Advice – Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo

During the summer, I will be sharing thematic posts bringing together responses on similar topics from the past nine years. You can see all those collections from the first eight years here.

Here are the ones I’ve posted so far:

This Year’s Most Popular Q&A Posts

Race & Racism in Schools

School Closures & the Coronavirus Crisis

Today’s theme is on Classroom-Management Advice. You can see the list following this excerpt from one of them:

* ‘It’s Vital to Focus on Student Engagement’

Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Rita Platt, Gabriella Corales, Leticia Skae-Jackson, and Madeline Whitaker Good offer their best classroom-management

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